Luvi Silverberg
November 19, 2022

How to Bypass Oil Pressure Switch

Introduction

If you are having issues with your oil pressure gauge not registering or reading low, then this video may help in diagnosing oil pressure switch problems in your car! Protect your engine by checking your oil level and getting regular oil changes!

Step 1: locate oil pressure switch on engine.

Step 1: Locate the oil pressure switch on your engine. The oil pressure switch is located in the engine compartment of your car. It's usually located near the oil filter or drain plug, but it can be anywhere on your vehicle's engine block. If you're not sure where yours is, consult with a professional mechanic for guidance and assistance until you know where it is located and how to get to it safely.

Step 2: get test light.

With a test light, you can check for voltage at the switch. You should be able to buy one at any hardware store or online. Simply follow the directions on your light and then connect it to the switch's two terminals (see photo for example). If there is power flowing through the switch, your light will come on!

Step 3: disconnect oil pressure switch connector and turn ignition key to the run position.

Disconnect the oil pressure switch connector and turn the ignition key to the "run" position. Be ready to start the vehicle but do not start it yet! Connect one lead of your test light to a good ground like an intake manifold bolt or battery post. Connect another lead of your test light to ground again, but leave this lead unattached for now, and then move on to step 4 below...

Step 4: be ready to start the vehicle but do not start it yet!

  • Be ready to start the vehicle but do not start it yet!

  • Do not turn the key to the run position yet!

  • Do not start the engine yet!

  • Do not crank the engine yet!

Step 5: connect one lead of the test light to a good ground like an intake manifold bolt.

Connect one lead of the test light to a good ground like an intake manifold bolt. Be sure to connect the test light to a good ground so you don't blow a fuse or damage the test light. An example of a good ground for the test light is an intake manifold bolt.

Step 6: connect other lead to the oil pressure switch connector terminal.

Connect the test light to the oil pressure switch connector terminal. Turn your ignition key to run position. If the light comes on, you have a bad sensor; if not, then you have a bad oil pump.

Step 7: start engine and let it run at fast idle if possible.

It's time to start the engine and see if your bypass switch works. If it's not working, you'll need to fix or replace your oil pressure switch.

If you're able to start the engine with no problems, hold your breath as you let it idle at fast speed for about 2 minutes. This should allow enough time for all of the oil in the pump to reach all of its necessary destinations without having any leaks through any valves that might still be open—if this is successful, an oil pressure gauge will register between 40 and 60 pounds per square inch (psi) of working pressure in order for everything else on this car not work correctly.*

Step 8: check with test light to see if the light glows while cranking the engine. If so, replace oil pressure sensor.

Once you've gotten a reading on the test light, check your oil pressure gauge. If it's low, then the oil pressure switch may be bad. If it's high but fluctuating, then your pump might be bad. Either way, get regular oil changes and check the level regularly to avoid this problem in the future:

Step 9: if not, the oil pump is failing and needs to be replaced.

If you don't feel a change when turning the engine over, or if it feels like a "miss," then you have an oil pump problem. Oil pumps have been known to fail. If your oil pump has failed, it can cause some serious damage to your engine. Oil pumps are responsible for circulating oil throughout the engine and lubricating all moving parts inside so that they don't rub together and create friction as they move against each other. When an oil pump fails, there is not enough pressure coming out of this device to feed all of these moving parts with adequate lubrication which can lead to overheating (as if you need more reason than that!) or even worse—a complete breakdown of your entire vehicle!

In order for this part of our warning system test procedure we'll need access through a panel on top where we will remove two screws holding down two wires going into our switch before disconnecting one wire from another that goes directly across underneath where those two were connected at first; now grab yourself some tweezers because there's going nowhere else left but where I just pointed out here."

If you are having issues with your oil pressure gauge not registering or reading low, then this video may help in diagnosing oil pressure switch problems in your car! Protect your engine by checking your oil level and getting regular oil changes!

Oops! Click Regenerate Content below to try generating this section again.

Conclusion

If your oil pressure gauge is not reading correctly and you are having issues with starting and running the engine, then it may be time to check the oil pressure switch. This video will show how easy it is to test or replace an oil pressure switch in your car! Protect your engine by checking the oil level and getting regular oil changes!